Help Protect Our Seas

The Task Force is a coalition of ten environmental organisations campaigning for healthy and productive seas in Northern Ireland. Explore our website to find out why our seas are so in need of protection and scroll down to see our amazing wildlife. Join our campaign to ensure that our seas are protected, today, tomorrow and forever.

Puffin

Photograph by Damian Waters

Kitiwake

Photograph by Margaret Holland

Gannet

Photograph by Tom Marshall

Black Guillemot

Photograph by Tom Marshall

Manx Shearwater

Photograph by Amy Lewis

Birds

There are 18 species of seabird that regularly breed in Northern Ireland. Find out where to see them and how we can help protect them.

Common seal

Photograph by Amy Lewis

Harbour Porpoise

Photograph by Randal Counihan

Grey Seal

Photograph by Tom Marshall

Orca (killer whale)

Photograph by Gillian Day

Minke whale

Photograph by Eleanor Stone

Marine Mammals

Northern Ireland has two species of seals. 24 species of cetacean (whales, dolphins & porpoises) have been recorded in Irish waters, with 8 species regular visitors or residents to our shores.

Basking Shark

Photograph by Andrew Pearson

Common Skate

Photograph by Orkney Skate Trust

Sand eel

Photograph by Pixabay

Atlantic mackerel

Photograph by Oceans 2012

European bass

Photograph by Paul Naylor

Ballan wrasse

Photograph by Bernard Picton, Ulster Museum

Fish

This large grouping of animals includes fish, sharks, skates & rays.

Velvet crab

Photograph by Bernard Picton, Ulster Museum

Dublin bay prawn

Photograph by Paul Naylor

Lobster

Photograph by Julie Hatcher

Sea urchin

Photograph by Bernard Picton, Ulster Museum

Bloody Henry Starfish

Photograph by Claire Goodwin, Ulster Museum

Starfish (sun star)

Photograph by Claire Goodwin, Ulster Museum

Brittle sea star

Photograph by Claire Goodwin, Ulster Museum

Octopus

Photograph by Bernard Picton, Ulster Museum

Horse Mussel

Photograph by Bernard Picton, Ulster Museum

Nudibranch

Photograph by Bernard Picton, Ulster Museum

Dog whelk

Photograph by Paul Naylor

Queen scallop

Photograph by Claire Goodwin, Ulster Museum

Crustaceans, Echinoderms (starfish & sea urchins), Molluscs

These are three very different groups of animal with vastly different characteristics.

Anemone (Dahlia)

Photograph by Bernard Picton, Ulster Museum

Coral (red sea fingers)

Photograph by Bernard Picton, Ulster Museum

Devonshire cup coral

Photograph by Bernard Picton, Ulster Museum

Blue Jellyfish

Photograph by Bernard Picton, Ulster Museum

Knotted-thread hydroid

Photograph by Bernard Picton, Ulster Museum

Boring sponge

Photograph by Bernard Picton

Incrusting sponge

Photograph by Bernard Picton

Anemones, corals, jellyfish, hydrozoans, sponges

Kelp sp. (Brown algae)

Photograph by Bernard Picton, Ulster Museum

Sea beech (red algae)

Photograph by Bernard Picton, Ulster Museum

Maerl bed (red algae sp)

Photograph by Bernard Picton, Ulster Museum

Sea grass (zostera)

Photograph by Bernard Picton, Ulster Museum

Knotted wrack (brown algae)

Photograph by Marguerite Tarzia

Seaweed, maerl and seagrass

Seaweeds are plant-like-algae. Like land-plants they are vitally important to the ecosystem, as they provide food and habitat to countless marine and coastal species. Seagrass species however are considered 'true plants'

Northern Ireland's seas need protection.
Find out why and how marine protection works

How highly protected areas work

Create, protect and enforce the highly protected area.

Over time the protected fish and other species inside this protected area get bigger, older and have more babies. The population size increases.

Over time as the protected area allows the populations of fish and other species to increase, some individuals 'spill over' the highly protected boundary into the outside area.

SLIDE ME

sign-the-marine-bill

Help protect our Marine Life,

Together we are campaigning for new, integrated marine
legislation through a Northern Ireland Marine Bill.